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Snapshot of Community Projects as a Result of a VCRD Community Visit

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Snapshot of Community Projects as a Result of a VCRD Community Visit

Almost all towns have built community spirit and engaged new volunteers. Projects have been advanced and accomplished ranging from a town merger in Richford, to building a senior living project in Wilmington, revitalizing downtowns in Bellows Falls and Brandon, or building a youth center in Bradford. Samples of town accomplishments are listed below. 

  • St Johnsbury (2015): Improving community communications and promoting a positive Town image; developing a St. Johnsbury warming shelter; redeveloping and revitalizing downtown buildings; redeveloping the St. Johnsbury riverfront; and improving housing in downtown St. Johnsbury.
  • Swanton (2015): Expanding outdoor recreation opportunities, river access, bike-ability and bike tourism; created a very active Swanton Arts Council; built a Swanton economic development committee; working to reduce substance abuse; and improving traffic, walkability, and parking downtown.
  • Cambridge (2014): Developing a Senior Living Center and expanding senior services; advancing a Cambridge Community Center; expanding communications, capacity, and efficiency for community and economic development; and evaluating municipal structure to better coordinate efforts for the long-term benefit of the community.
  • Vergennes (2014): Improving the physical appearance of the Falls Basin area and developing a river-walk; coordinating efforts to improve the economic outlook of the City; and working on sidewalk extensions and other transportation improvements.
  • Manchester (2013): Redevelopment underway on Battenkill Riverside, biking task force expanding routes and facilities; incubating businesses and setting up a structure for expanded adult and continuing education opportunities.
  • Guilford (2013): Redeveloping the Grange Building; working to incubate new businesses in village center; and expanding pre-school and community center activities.
  • Cabot (2012): Developed a farmers’ network; built a new arts association and arts center task force; and improved communications and scheduling.
  • Bennington (2011): Developed new communications tools and branding; built and anti-poverty campaign that expanded low income dental care.
  • Morrisville (2011): Has developed a framework for a new community foods coop, expanded paths and trails and improving buildings and economic development downtown.
  • Marlboro (2010): Planning for a Marlboro Community Center Building to serve as a connecting point for multiple groups in the community. They are also working to improve walk-ability and expand bike and walking paths. 
  • Fairfield (2010): Improved community communications and calendar, built new markets and movement for agricultural partners including a new on-line farmers market.
  • Shoreham (2009): Working to attract village economic development and to build a business incubator. Other initiatives include improving civic participation and exploring in town energy opportunities.
  • Killington (2008): Built a system for positive Town/Mountain communications and problem solving; set a 4‐season economic development planning process with substantial funding from a 1% municipal rooms, meals, and sales tax.
  • Derby (2007): Evaluating steps toward town/village merger and solving water sewer infrastructure issues.
  • Richford (2007): Working to increase police protection and its connection to community; new health center and grocery in the old Sweat Comings property seen as keystone to future downtown development.
  • Pownal (2006): Established a Housing Task Force that built a mobile home tenants association and is planning for an affordable housing project; developed community gardens and activities; built tourism map and a communications campaign to tell the good story of the town’s success.
  • Hinesburg (2006): The town voted funds to contract for services to advance initiatives; improved energy efficiency, stopped bus idling, lightbulb campaign, advanced the agricultural economy.
  • Chelsea (2005): Gained ACCD Planning Grant to staff Community Visit Task Forces, building a community facilities and infrastructure plan.
  • Woodstock (2005): Set community priorities for town/village merger, built an east end development corporation, expanding conservation, expanded walking trails and developed a town trails map, and building a Woodstock Vision.
  • Johnson (2004): Leveraged significant federal funds to replace three bridges, build a water system, and implement redesign of downtown; built a community calendar, and instituted a Winter Carnival and a summer concert series to unite and market the community.
  • Bristol (2004): Inventoried potential space for small industrial park, set key attributes of businesses to attract, redeveloping Bartlett Falls area, improved storm water system.
  • Enosburg (2003): Instituted a community‐wide literacy campaign and mentorship program, set up a Restorative Justice Board, new recreation park, town web page, unified town/village public works, financing, planning/zoning and offices.
  • Troy, Westfield, Jay (2002): Built walking trails and events celebrating downtown Troy and took steps in the development of “Tranquil Gardens.”
  • Poultney (2002): Built new youth activities and mentorships, expanded collaborations with Green Mountain College, designed new town banners and a town marketing strategy, beautified Main Street and filled storefronts, developed a Community Video, started Artist and Writers Guilds, opened the slate museum, built a consensus Vision for the community.
  • Wilmington (2001): Built a Vision for Wilmington’s future economic development, built a senior housing project.
  • Northfield (2001): Redeveloped the old town school as a community center and set agreements for water/wastewater development.
  • Bradford (1999): Village revitalization was boosted with library repairs, the development of Boch park, and ongoing affordable housing efforts; work proceeding still toward town/village merger.
  • Middletown Springs (1999): Built sections of the town plan and set up the Middletown Springs Conservation Commission.
  • Brandon (1999): Earned Downtown Designation and encouraged significant downtown investment, built a town economic development budget, promoted new recreation development and seeded Brandon’s recent success as a creative economy model.
  • Rockingham (1998): Downtown housing, downtown revitalization, and rebuilding the Bellows Falls image were goals accomplished: today the reborn downtown is a model of creative economy development.
  • Richford (1996): Merged village & town; built affordable housing, river paths, a new health center and plans to redevelop Sweat‐Cummings downtown industrial plant; charted millions in grants in support of Community Visit Task Force action plans.